Household Books Published in Britain: V5 - 1800-1914 (DA)


ARRANGEMENT OF MATERIAL

The nineteenth century bibliographies attempt to record the history of all those books meeting the criteria for selection outlined in the various introductions which were first published during the period 1800 to 1914. The source texts by Dena Attar and Elizabeth Driver, are highly detailed descriptive bibliographies with considerable analytical information. The material for cookery books 1800-1874 was gathered by Lynette Hunter for the format followed by the Cambridge Bibliography for English Literature and is considerably less detailed. Some books drawn from this bibliography are written by authors elsewhere in this section of the bibliography, and this is indicated with an asterisk. The arrangement of material outlined below focuses on the more detailed presentation of descriptive and analytical information, which varies from volume to volume. Where the variation results in significant differences this is noted.

Apart from cookery books 1800-1874, each book is followed from its first edition or first known edition, to the last edition in which it is recognisably the same book, and each has been assigned a reference number. Entries take the form of heading, biographical material, title-page transcription, imprint, description, citation in other bibliographies, locations, comments and in some cases, following the entry for the final edition, general comments reflecting back over the history of the book and a list of non-British editions. In each of these sections the information is laid out in a particular way which is discussed below.

The reader should be warned that the examples used in the explanations of the various sections are not always from real entries in the bibliography. Some have been devised for the purposes of the introduction, to make a point as clearly and economically as possible.

Entries take the form of headings, series headings, volume entries, biographical material, reference numbers, titles, imprints, unseen books, descriptions, citations, locations, comments and multiple-volume entries. In each of these the information is laid out in a way discussed below.

Headings

There are three types of headings: main headings, cross-reference headings and series headings. Main headings usually consist of the name of the author and are listed in alphabetical order. Where no author's name, actual or assumed, can be found the work is entered under the title. Such title entries consist of the short-title, omitting the article if there is one, and are included in the same alphabetical sequence as the authors' names. Abbreviated words in headings such as 'Dr', 'St' or 'Mrs' are arranged alphabetically as if spelled out 'Doctor', 'Saint' or 'Mistress'.

There are a number of cross-references within headings which direct the reader to the heading under which the main entry occurs. In most cases the cross-reference is to an author's name or to a title, and in some instances to both.

  1. The aim of the heading is to provide the actual name of the author, including the forenames and birth and death dates if they are known. Where necessary there is a cross-reference from a commonly used name to the actual name.
  2. The author's name is normally taken from the title-page or a signed preface. If the name is known only from sources outside the actual book, there is a cross-reference from the short-title of the work to the author's name.
  3. Where an author used or was known by the titles 'Miss' or 'Mrs' these are given. In the case of a married woman writer, if she has written books under both her married and unmarried names, there is a cross-reference to the form most commonly used in her books on culinary subjects. Wherever possible the forename of the woman rather than her husband is used for the heading, and if she were more commonly known by her husband's name there is sometimes a cross-reference from that name to her own.
  4. In the case of hyphenated names, the first name is taken as the alphabetical guide, and there is a cross-reference from the second to the first. For example, the main heading for Arthur R. Kenney-Herbert is found under the letter 'K'.
  5. In the case of names beginning with a specific prefix such as 'de' or 'van', the prefix and following name are considered as one word for alphabetical purposes.
  6. If authors held honorific titles such as Sir or Lady, by which they were normally known, the title is given in the heading immediately preceding the forename. But if the title was not normally used it is not indicated.
  7. For authors writing under full honorific titles there are cross-references from the honorific title to the actual name.
  8. When a work is published under an author's initials, and the full name of the author is not known, the initials are used for the main heading. But if the author's name is known, there is a cross-reference from the initials to the actual name.
  9. Similarly, if an author wrote under a pseudonym, or pseudonyms, the entries are placed under the actual name with cross-references from the pseudonym(s). If the actual name is not known, the entry is under the pseudonym and the heading is followed by 'pseud'.
  10. If an author wrote under a descriptive term such as 'lady' or 'medical practitioner' or 'old bohemian', the main entry is under the real name if known, with a cross-reference from the title, or under the title if the real name is not known. There are no cross-references from descriptive terms.
  11. A translated work is listed under the original author's name if it is known, with a cross-reference from the translator's name. If it is not known, the main entry is found under the title with a cross-reference from the translator's name.
  12. Works concerning official institutions, schools, societies and so on, are entered under the name of the author or title if anonymous, with a cross-reference from the name of the institution, school or society. Official institutions are entered under the name of the place where they are situated, but schools, societies and commercial firms are entered under their proper name.
  13. The main heading for works written either in conjunction or in clearly defined parts by two or more authors is listed alphabetically under the first actual name to be cited on the title-page, unless the work was commonly known under the name of one of the other authors. There are cross-references from the second, or other, name(s) to the main heading which consists of all the names on the title-page.
  14. If a new co-author was brought in at a later date, there is a cross-reference from the new co-author's name to the original author's that notes the edition of the work when he or she became involved. However, there are no cross-references from new co-authors who appeared after 1914.
  15. If a work has two or more editors, it is entered under the form of headings for works with two or more authors.
  16. If a work has two or more authors but the first cited name on the title-page is an anonymous person or institutional body, the main entry occurs under the first-cited actual name. For example, to find the main entry for Diet and cookery for common ailments by a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Phyllis Browne, look under Browne.
  17. If a single work has several authors and an editor, it is entered under the editor's name with cross-references from the authors to that name.

Series headings

Each series has a heading under the series title. However the main entry for any one individual part of a series is found under the author's name if known or under the title if not. General comments about the series, including a list of the individual titles in it, may be given under the series heading.

  1. If a series contains only one or two parts irrelevant to the topic of the bibliography, every effort will have been made to list all the parts under the series heading. However, if a series contains only one or two relevant parts, only those parts are listed under the series title, although there may well be further general comments on the scope of the full series.
  2. Cross-references are made from the series heading to the authors of the individual parts or to the titles of any parts whose authors are unknown.

Volume Entries

The main entry for the first edition of a work consisting of several volumes or parts, differs from subsequent entries for later editions in that it holds the main heading and brief observations on the books. The main heading will be under the name of the author if it is known or under the title for the collected volumes. This will often be followed by a brief commentary on the publishing history of the work, which will be printed in italics. Other commentary applicable to all volumes of each edition will be found in the general comments (see Comments below) at the end of the entire entry.

The first entry and all subsequent entries will consist of title-page transcription, imprint, descriptions for each volume, locations, and comments on the specific edition. The title-page transcription contains the wording common to all volumes; and where it is not indicated in the transcription itself, it will conclude with a note of the number of volumes in the work in brackets. The imprint information given will only be that common to all volumes, as will the note on locations. Within each entry there will be a sub-heading for each volume, which will note any additional information on the title-page, or about the imprint and location, and provide a full description. The section giving comments will restrict itself to details relevant to the volumes of the edition being discussed.

Biographical material

The section on biographical material is primarily intended for a summary of any details about an author relevant to the topic that the bibliographic research has revealed. Material about the whole of an author's life is not included unless it is felt that the author is of such importance as to justify this. But attempts have been made, for all authors, to determine the birth and death dates by consulting standard reference works. If no source for the birth and death dates is given in the biographical section, they have been taken from the National union catalog.

The biographical section also includes cross-references between Dena Attar's Household books published in Britain 1800-1914 which appears as for example: See Attar 286, and Elizabeth Driver's Cookery books published in Britain 1875-1914, appearing as: See Driver 114.

Reference numbers

Apart from cookery books 1800-1874, each book is allocated a reference number unique to the volume from which it derives, which appears in the left-hand margin adjacent to the first line of the title-page transcription.

For household books 1800-1914 the reference number consists of up to three parts, each separated by a full stop, for example: 21.3.2. The first number of the three refers to the work being described, and these numbers run consecutively throughout the bibliography. The second number of the three refers to the edition of the work being described, and the third number is reserved for volumes or parts of an edition of a work. The number 21.3.2 would indicate the second volume of the third edition of the twenty-first work described in the bibliography. In the numbering system, reissues are treated as editions of works because it has often proved impossible to identify editions from which they are derived.

For cookery books 1875-1914 the reference number consists of two parts separated by a full stop, for example: 21.3. The first number refers to the work being described, and these numbers run consecutively throughout the bibliography. The second number differentiates one edition from another. It does not necessarily correspond to the edition number cited in the book or, in the case of a book not numbered by the publisher, to an edition number deduced by the bibliographer.

Titles

Transcriptions of titles are provided for all editions that have been seen. Sometimes the bibliographer has given a title transcription for an edition she has not seen, which may have been taken from a photocopy of the title-page supplied by a library or private collector. In such cases the source of the photocopy is noted in the comments. In cases where an edition has not been seen, but where there is information from other sources as to its existence, it as entered under the form for unseen books (see below).

All first editions or first entries of a work, whether transcriptions or not, are full-out across the page. All subsequent editions are preceded by a dash.

Titles are transcribed from the title-page. Those from the Attar and Driver volumes attempt to maintain the original spelling and punctuation. The publisher's differentiation between upper and lower case has not been preserved. Instead, transcriptions are given in the lower case, except for the initial word of the title, proper and place names, and titles of other books within the transcription. These last have all their main words capitalised in order to make the title stand out clearly, and not be confused with the text of surrounding transcription. Accents over both lower and upper case letters are transcribed from the title-page where they appear. Elsewhere in the bibliographical entry the convention of not indicating accents over capital letters is followed. Line endings, where noted, are indicated by a single vertical bar. Where a break has to be indicated to make sense of a title, a double vertical bar is inserted. Additional material on the title-page such as a quotation, is not included, but may be noted in the comments.

  1. If a title is the same as that of a preceding edition, reference to that edition is noted within square brackets:
    [Title as 1897]
    [Title as second edition]
  2. If a title of a book is the same as that of a preceding edition except for the addition of a small number of words (usually the edition number) before or after that title, the additional words are placed in their correct location before or after a reference to that preceding edition. If the additional words begin on a new line, as is most often the case, the line ending is indicated by a single vertical bar:
    A new edition | [Title as 1897]
    [Title as 1897] | Third edition
  3. If the title is the same as a preceding edition which was published in the same year as another edition, the year is noted, and the specific edition is identified either by edition number, or if that is not known by other means:
    [Title as second edition, 1897]
    [Title as 1897 at LB]
  4. If a title transcription is obtained from any part of the book other than the title-page, this is noted in square brackets immediately following the transcription:
    Currant cookery [Cover-title]

Imprints

The recording of imprints represents rather than transcribes the information on the title-page, and is provided for all seen editions of every work. In cases where the volume has not been seen it is listed under the form for unseen books (see below). The imprint information has been standardised so that the normal rules for capitalisation of proper and place names are followed, and punctuation is usually only used to separate parts of the information.

  1. Imprint information begins with the place of publication, or if this is not indicated, with the place of printing, and is followed by the publisher and the date of publication in arabic numerals.
  2. When two or more places of publication occur on the title-page, both or all are provided. These entries may occur in two forms:
    1. where there are two or more places of publication and one publisher:
      London and Manchester: Godwin Brothers
    2. where there are two or more places of publication and two or more publishers:
      London: Godwin Brothers; Manchester: Godwin and Co
  3. When both the place of printing and place of publication are given, both are recorded:
    London: printed by Acme Printers, Manchester, for Godwin Brothers
  4. If a work is 'printed for the author' and there is no other publisher, the author is taken as the publisher.
  5. If no date appears on the title-page but has been found elsewhere in the volume, the date is placed in square brackets and the location is noted in the comments.
  6. If no date can be discovered in a work, this is indicated by: (nd).

Unseen books

Whereas books which have been seen are immediately recognisable by their transcription or by the words [Title as . . .], entries for unseen books begin with an indication of the edition within square brackets. Unseen books do not have a section for imprint, but information about the date is included within the square brackets at the start of the entry. All other information concerning the provenance of the information, or the publisher, is found in the comments section. If there is sufficient reason, such as a significant of unusual provenance, the reader will be specifically directed to the comments by the words 'see comments' within square brackets.

  1. The form for first entries gives the edition number or the description 'an edition' if the edition number is unknown, the short-title and date:
    [An edition of 'Cookery book', 1897]
    [First edition of 'Cookery book', 1897]
  2. There are four forms for entries of subsequent editions:
    1. when sources indicate that the work is different from other editions, but there is no further definite information about the edition number or date:
      [Another edition]
    2. when sources indicate that the work is a specific edition, Driver indicates:
      [Another edition, second]
      Attar indicates:
      [Second edition]
      Hunter indicates in the Notes section:
      Third edition
    3. when sources indicate that the work was published in a specific year:
      [Another edition, 1898]
    4. when sources indicate that the work is a specific edition, published in a specific year:
      [Another edition, second, 1898]
    5. when sources indicate there are more editions than those catalogued, this is indicated by the addition of '+'

Description

The description section includes bibliographic information which always follows the pattern: dimensions, pagination, illustration, price, binding, half-title. The information is presented in an abbreviated manner using the signs and symbols identified in 'Abbreviations' (see below).

Dimensions: Height of the leaves is the first recorded dimension, and is followed by the width of the leaves. The measurements are given to the nearest half centimetre, but this can only be a rough guide. Since the dimensions are determined by the extent to which the binder trimmed the leaves, the leaves of any one volume may have been trimmed unevenly and different copies of the same edition may vary slightly in size. It should also be noted that paper is a hydroscopic material which will expand or contract depending upon the relative humidity of the environment.

Pagination: The first page of a book is considered to be the recto side of the first leaf with any print on either side. The last page of the book is considered to be the last printed page of the book.

  1. In general the listing of pagination follows the printer's enumeration, and where necessary commas are inserted into the pagination for clarity.
  2. Commercial and publisher's advertisements are included in the pagination, the former being distinguished by 'ads' and the latter, wherever possible, by 'publ ads'. These abbreviations occur at the end of a run of numbers and refer to all the numbers within that run which have been marked off by commas.
    1. when pages 1-54 are text, pages i-iv are publisher's advertisements, and pages v-viii are commercial advertisements:
      1-54, i-iv publ ads, v-viii ads
  3. Those parts of the work without pagination are noted in square brackets. In most cases the numbers in square brackets follow the pattern set by the publisher. If there is no established scheme, that is if the entire book or whole sections of it are unpaginated, the unnumbered pages are enumerated according to the general plan of text in arabic and opening and closing advertisements in small roman. Where there are a series of unpaginated sections, the enumeration may alternate between roman and arabic in order to make the distinction.
    1. unpaginated but printed pages, preceding pages enumerated in small roman numerals at the start of the work, are collated in arabic numerals within square brackets.
    2. unpaginated preliminary pages included in the pages enumerated in small roman numerals are collated in small roman numerals within square brackets.
    3. unpaginated pages of the actual text are collated in arabic numerals within square brackets.
    4. unpaginated concluding pages not part of the text, such as commercial advertisements or publisher's advertisements, are collated in small roman numerals if preceded by a group in arabic, and in arabic if preceded by a group in roman.
    5. unpaginated concluding pages part of a group of enumerated pages are collated in the same numerals but within square brackets.
  4. Occasionally, for clarity, the leaf on which the half-title or title-page is printed is identified by 'ht' or 'tp' after the page numbers for that leaf. In such cases the half-title or title-page is understood to be on the recto of the leaf:
    [i-ii] ht, 1-574
  5. Pagination is recorded as it stands. Any irregularities discovered by the researcher are noted.

Illustrations: Information about illustration occurs in the order: frontispiece, title-page illustration, plates, full-page illustrations, illustrations. Commas are used to separate the unique parts of the information. Each description of illustrative matter consistently follows the order: colour, technique. If no indication is given of the colour, the image is printed in black only. The abbreviation 'col' means that the image is printed in colour, rather than that the image has been hand-coloured. Sometimes the bibliographer describes the printing colours specifically, for example: pl col printed in blue.

  1. A frontispiece is held to be illustrative matter either preceding or facing the title-page, and is either a plate or an illustration. The description notes the colour and sometimes the technique.
  2. Illustrative matter incorporated into the title-page may be printed using various methods. The description notes the colour and sometimes the technique.
  3. A plate is defined as a full-page book illustration, printed separately from the text, often on different paper and using different techniques.
    1. where plates are unnumbered they are described as:
      6 pls
    2. where plates are numbered they are described as:
      6 num pls
    3. where there are numbered and unnumbered plates they are described separately as:
      9 num pls, 6 pls
    4. where the frontispiece and plates are unnumbered they are described together as, in Driver and Hunter:
      6 pls incl frontis
      in Attar:
      Frontis, 5 pls
      [In this case the book has 6 unnumbered plates made up of 1 frontispiece and 5 other plates]
    5. where the frontispiece and plates are numbered they are described together as:
      6 num pls incl frontis
      [In this case the book has 6 numbered plates in total, of which the frontispiece is one]
    6. where a numbered frontispiece differs from other numbered plates either by colour or technique, this is made clear, as for example:
      Frontis col litho, 5 pls litho, all num
      [In this case the book has a colour lithograph frontispiece, one of 6 numbered plates, the remaining 5 being printed in black only]
    7. where illustrative matter is printed on both the recto and verso of a leaf, the recto and verso are counted together as:
      3 double-sided pls
      [In this case the book has 6 full-page images printed on the recto and verso of 3 leaves]
  4. An illustration is held to be illustrative matter printed on the same paper as the text and usually either with printed text surrounding it or on its reverse side. Full-page illustrations are counted, otherwise only the presence of illustrative matter is noted.

Price: Wherever possible a price is given for each work. If the price is simply listed in the description, this means that it has been taken from the title-page; but if the price has been found elsewhere it is put in square brackets with a note of the source(s). One of the more common sources for a price given in square brackets is the book's binding. If the source of the price is lengthy, it is given in the comments.

Binding: Descriptions of bindings are not analytical, but are intended to give general information only. Each description specifies the colour of the binding of the volume being examined, the type of the binding, and any image printed on the front face of the binding. The bibliographer has kept descriptions of colour simple, using for example white, light brown, green and red in place of such terms as ivory, beige, olive or maroon. The following are common examples of binding descriptions:

Red cloth
Describes a volume bound in stiff boards that have been covered with red cloth.
Red cloth with steaming pudding on front
Describes the above volume but with the image of a pudding printed on the Front face of the binding.
Red paper covered boards
Describes a volume bound in stiff boards that have been covered with red paper.
Red limp cloth
Describes a volume bound in paper that has been covered with red cloth.
Red paper
Describes a volume bound in red paper.
Full red leather
Describes a volume bound in stiff boards and covered with red leather on all exterior surfaces: front, back and spine.
Half red leather
Describes a volume bound in stiff boards and covered with red leather on the spine and corners only, cloth often being the material covering the remaining exterior surfaces.
Half red leather and green cloth
Describes a volume where red leather covers the spine and corners, and green cloth covers the remaining exterior surfaces.
Quarter red leather
Describes a volume bound in stiff boards and covered with red leather on the spine only, cloth often being the material covering the remaining exterior surfaces.
Rebound
Describes a volume no longer in its original binding.

Half-title: The half-title is transcribed as it appears, but without indicating line breaks, and using the same rules for capitalisation as the title.

Citations

The five main existing bibliographies relevant to this work have been searched for references to any edition of all the books included. The five bibliographies are:

  • Axford, Lavonne Brady. English language cookbooks, 1600-1973. Published by the Gale Research Company, Detroit, 1976.
  • Bitting, Katharine Golden. Gastronomic bibliography. First published in 1939, republished by Gryphon Books, Ann Arbor, 1971, and by The Holland Press, London, 1981.
  • Oxford, Arnold Whitaker. English cookery books to the year 1850. First published 1913, reprinted by The Holland Press, London, 1977.
  • Simon, Andre. Bibliotheca gastronomica. First published 1953, republished by The Holland Press, London, 1978.
  • Vicaire, Georges. Bibliographie gastronomique. First published 1890, republished by The Holland Press, London, 1978.

Within the comments these books are abbreviated as Axford, Bitting, Oxford, Simon, Vicaire, and within the citation line as A, B, O, S, and V, respectively. References in these bibliographies are identified by page number following the abbreviated letter.

Occasionally, citations in bibliographies other than the above five are recorded in the citation line or comments. Full references for other bibliographies are given under 'Frequently cited works' in the 'Abbreviations' section (see below).

Locations

The library holding the copy which was examined for the bibliographic information and from which the title-page transcription was taken, is denoted within the location line by an asterisk. Any notes in the comments section refer to the copy in the asterisked library unless the bibliographer indicates otherwise.

Priority has been given to finding locations for works within Great Britain and the United States, but a few other countries are also included. The location section records the countries separately in the alphabetical order of their abbreviated forms which are listed in 'Abbreviations' (see below).

For Great Britain and the United States the aim has been to provide three locations in each country for every work, but if more have been found they have been included.

Within Great Britain priority has been given to the copyright libraries of the British Library, the Bodleian and the National Library of Scotland. The abbreviations for British libraries have been devised according to the rules followed by Symbols of American libraries for libraries within the United States, and are listed in 'Abbreviations'. Within the location line these libraries are recorded in the alphabetical order of their abbreviations.

For the United States, the primary source of locations is the National union catalog, whose abbreviations are taken from Symbols of American libraries, which is also the source for abbreviations for libraries not included in the National union catalog. However, it has been necessary to devise a small number of abbreviations for American libraries which are not listed in Symbols of American libraries, and this has been done in accordance with its rules. The abbreviations for all United States libraries which actively contributed to the bibliography are listed in 'Abbreviations', and abbreviations for all other mentioned United States locations can be found in Symbols of American libraries. Within the location line the libraries are recorded in the order in which they appear in the National union catalog, since the first cited library is the one from which the catalogue entry was compiled. Other locations that lie outside the catalogue follow those recorded in it. The reader is warned that library locations taken from the National union catalog are only as accurate as the catalogue itself; however, in cases where the bibliographer suspects the location or bibliographic data to be incorrect, she has checked with the libraries concerned.

If a book listed in a library catalogue was not found on the shelf, 'missing' follows the library abbreviation. In the case of a book recorded in the British Museum catalogue but now destroyed (many books were lost during the war), 'destroyed' follows 'LB' for British Library. Microfilm copies of books are indicated by 'micro' after the library abbreviation. If the location of the original book from which the microfilm was made is known, the abbreviation for that location follows 'micro'; for example, 'LB micro OB' indicates that the British Library holds a microfilm of a book in the Bodleian Library. While every attempt has been made to provide a library location, some works were found by the bibliographer only within private collections or booksellers' stock. In these cases the location is indicated as 'Priv coll' or 'Bookseller's stock'.

Comments

A comments section is provided when necessary for any edition. The information it contains often expands on the preceding description section (see above) and discusses the publishing history and contents of the work.

At the end of entries for either an extensive run of editions or of a particularly interesting work, a general comments section may be added. This contains information and remarks applicable to all editions of the work.

Multiple-volume entries

The standard form for entries has been modified for the more complex task of describing works of collected volumes.

  1. The main heading is the name of the author if it is known, or the title for the collected volumes. This may be followed by a brief commentary on the publishing history of the volumes, printed in italics. Other commentary is found in the general comments at the foot of the complete entry.
  2. For each edition the first title-page transcription is that of the first title-page in the first bound volume in that edition. The transcription is followed by a line within square brackets noting for that edition, firstly, the number of textual divisions by volume, and secondly, the number of separately bound volumes. For example, '[Two volumes bound in four]' means that the text is organised as two distinctly numbered parts, called volumes, which have been bound into four physically separate volumes. This in turn is followed by the imprint information from all the title-pages of this edition. Each imprint is identified by the volume number in roman numerals on the title-page on which it is found:
    The | encyclopaedia | of I practical cookery | Vol. I.  A to M
    [Two volumes bound in four]
    Volume I London: L. Upcott Gill; sole agent, A. W. Cowan, (nd)
    Volume II London: L. Upcott Gill, (nd)
  3. Following this information is a specific description of each bound volume introduced by the bound-volume number spelled out, any additional title-page transcriptions specific to that volume (some bound volumes may have no title-page while others may have one or more), then the description. The identifying volume number of each title-page is given in roman numerals to distinguish it from the bound-volume numbering. The description includes the size, pagination, illustrations, price and half-title specific to each bound volume:
    Volume One
    27.5 x 21.5 cm Pp [i- iii] iv [v vi], [1] 2-514 Frontis col, 634 num illus
    Volume Two
    No tp
    27.5 x 21.5 cm Pp 515'1,006 Illus num from 635 to 1,242
    Volume Three
    Tp of II: [Title as I] , Vol. II. - N to Z, menus, and index.
    27.5 x 21.5 cm Pp [i- iv], [1] 2 -512 664. num illus Ht: The encyclopaedia of practical cookery. Vol. II.
    Volume Four
    No tp
    27.5 x 21 .5 cm Pp 513-892 74 pls col incl 3 folding pls, all grouped together and following p 892; illus num from 665 to 1,088
  4. The specific description of each bound volume is followed by citation, location and comments for all the bound volumes of this edition. Binding information is in the comments section in the case of multiple-volume entries.